Archive for April, 2010

Goal – Lighting for a quadraplegic man

My next project is a relatively simple lighting installation for a disabled man.

For a while now I have been involved with TADACT (Technical Aid for Disabled, Australian Capital Territory). Disabled people don’t come off assembly lines and have unique variances within their broad disability category. The standard equipment is targeted at the most common issues but this often isn’t quite what they need. TADACT is a group of volunteers that modify or manufacture specialty equipment for disabled people where there isn’t an adequate commercial solution.

Late last year I visited a quadriplegic man and talked about installing a custom light for him. Due to a vehicle accident he has no control below his chest and only crude movement of his arms and one thumb. He is also unable to exert any force with his arms.

He wanted a light he could control from his bed. The bedside lamps he was using were difficult for him to control due to the small switches. He didn’t like sleeping in the dark at night so it had dim while he slept but be bright enough to read by. He also moves his arms around at night and there’s a risk he could seriously burn himself with the bedside lamps, he had actually burnt himself just before I met him and received third degree burns again last week.

Taking those requirements (and a few more) I came up with a proposal. I would mount three halogen bulbs on the wall, one pointed at the bed and two at the roof with each set independently controllable. The wiring will be secured to the wall. There were two options proposed for the switching, using two sliding foot dimmers or jellybean switches and custom control circuitry. The second option was considerably more expensive, the jellybean switches are specially designed for disabled purposes and cost over $100 for a switch with almost the same functionality as a $2 switch at Jaycar. The almost is of course the slight modifications that make them better for disabled people.

Initially they decided that even the cheap option was too expensive. Yesterday TADACT contacted me and said a local charity had provided funding for the foot switch option. So this month’s project is to complete this for TADACT. The aim is to install it by the weekend of the first or second of May, preferably the weekend before.

This probably won’t take all of my time so I’ll use the rest to clean up some other stuff I should have done a while ago, might even do last year’s tax return…

Tax Project March Wrap up

So I cheated a bit and pushed the deadline out a week. While much of the checklist is done the project overall is nowhere near where I hoped it would be. The issue I think was that I assumed that I would be productive for the whole weekend but it turns out I actually do do social stuff and regular maintenance like cleaning or ironing. Looking back I think I committed about half the time I expected to.

Tax website screenshot showing layout

Tax website screenshot

Target features

  • Templating system

    Check. Using TT2 as described earlier. The templating isn’t complete but I was
    always planning on growing it as I went. Sadly it doesn’t properly implement the
    primatives I’m using but It’s good to start with a win, even if you steal it.

  • Basic layout

    Check. To start off with I had a ghastly colour scheme of different shades of red and roughly the layout I ended up with. I read on one of those innumerable website design blogs that colour schemes are important. All the classic mood stuff, red is firey and aggresive, white is serious, boring and reliable. Reliable seems like a good mood for a tax website but black and white is a bit too hard for someone as inept as I to pull off. So I went with a cream background and a yellow/browny secondary colour.

  • Functional data entry

    Check. This works pretty well actually, change an input box and it’s immediately pushed to the server. Not perfect (none of the code is), notably it’s not fully backgrounded so you get a slight delay.

  • Javascript data checking

    Fail. I didn’t get around to trying this.

  • Serverside storage

    Check. I went with MongoDB and it’s going well so far. Ended up having to write a very simple PHP script to expose the DB to the Javascript, primarily authentication wrapping.

  • Basic calculations

    Partial. I have some calculations working but it’s not a reusable structure.

  • Independent domain name

    Fail. The project isn’t far along enough to be useful yet so the domain isn’t important, so I’m marking this as a fail but don’t care. I also couldn’t find a free name I liked.

  • Public source repository

    Check.http://github.com/lod/Australian-Tax-Return

Maybe features

  • Client side encryption

    Fail. Didn’t start on this.

  • User login system

    Check. Pretty easy to implement with the DB layer in place. I don’t have user
    creation working yet but that is actually a fairly small amount of work.

  • Basic personal tax pack covered

    Fail. I’m nowhere near achieving this, it’s crazy how much they cram into a few pages.

  • Client side PDF generation

    Fail. Didn’t start on this.

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